2012 Annual Report

J. Jeffrey Smythe

Chief of Police

Text Box: Police Department
     
 

 

 

Mission & Values Statements

The Police Department’s mission is to have “A Passion for Excellence!”  The Values of the agency are: 

Professionalism
R
espect
I
ntegrity
D
ignity
E
xcellence

Budget Highlights

The Police Department is organized into two divisions and several units in order to provide an adequate span of control and to identify specific program costs.  The two divisions are Operations and Operational Support.  The Operations Division includes Patrol, Traffic Safety and Investigations, while the Operational Support Division includes Administration, Animal Control and Communications.  

A full-time administrative assistant is included in the adopted budget. This function had been split between two part-time positions for the past couple of years and led to operational inefficiencies.  Inclusion of this 1.0 FTE position is offset by a 0.75 FTE reduction of part-time hours.  Following the adoption of the FY2012 budget, the City Council authorized the acceptance of two grants, COPS and a School Resource Officer (SRO) grant.  With the acceptance of these grants the Council authorized two additional police officer positions; these positions are included in the FY2012 total.  These modifications bring the Police Department’s overall staffing to 49.6 positions, of which 32.0 are sworn positions. 

Included in the 49.6 positions mentioned above are 11.3 positions in Communications and 2.5 positions in Animal Control.  Also included in this number are two School Resource Officers (SRO), both of which are full-time grant-funded through a service agreement with the school district, a grant-funded Major Crimes Apprehension Team (MCAT) Sergeant, an officer funded through the COPS program and one sworn Sergeant position dedicated to traffic safety and tied directly to photo enforcement.   

Budget Summary

The Police Department’s FY2013 budget of $5,503,000 represents an increase of $363,100 (7%) over the FY2012 budget of $5,139,900.  When adjusted for photo enforcement revenue modifications, there is a total increase of $512,900 (12%) over the FY2012 budget.  Included in this amount is $325,800 in personnel costs that are completely funded through the School District (SRO), Federal Government (COPS) and the County (MCAT). 

Salaries and fringe benefits total $4,177,600 and represent 77% of the Police Department’s general fund budget.  Salaries and fringes increase by $452,200 (12%) due to personnel cost increases and additional authorized positions.  Included in the Police Department’s general fund salaries amount is a total of $176,000 in overtime costs.  Overtime is used to cover shifts, work extended hours on active cases, special events, call-outs, holidays and training.

Non-personnel costs have a net decrease of $72,300 from the FY2012 budget.  When adjusted for photo enforcement revenue modifications and capital, there is a net increase of $95,800 (19%) over the FY2012 budget.  Only known grants are included in the budget, as grants are awarded to the department throughout the year.  Therefore, budget transfers will be authorized to establish budget authority for the amount of the grant, generally within the grants fund. 

Statistics

 

Patrol Statistics

2010

2011

2012

Citations Issued

5,441

4,944

3,411

Moving Violations

2,135

1,859

1,014

Warnings/Repair

2,134

2,051

1,373

Criminal Summons

748

699

755

Photo Enf. Violations

19,733

13,181

12,455

 

Arrests

2010

2011

2012

Felony

340

369

340

Misdemeanor

1,345

1,242

1,305

DUI

84

53

65

 

Part I Crime Data

2010

2011

2012

Homicide

1

2

0

Rape

3

4

3

Robbery

5

7

6

Agg Assault

58

73

78

Burglary

112

110

109

Larceny

302

390

450

Stolen Vehicle

19

10

12

Arson

2

4

0

 

 

2010

2011

2012

Collisions

220

215

204

Calls for Service

16,377

17,304

16,875

Officer Reports

2,888

2,804

2,822

 

Internal Affairs 

There were four internal affair investigations involving department members in 2012, down from 11 in 2011.  Two of these investigations resulted from external complaints filed by citizens.  Out of the four, two complaints were sustained and in the other two, the officers were exonerated. 

The complaints filed were categorized as use of force, policy violation and conduct on-duty.  Officers were exonerated in the use of force complaints. 

City Demographics

 

2010 Census

Total Population: 10,660

Caucasian

8,586

African-American

42

Hispanic

1,360

Other

672

 

Within the City there are:
140 miles of residential streets
32 miles of highway/arterial roadways
Over 1.4-million vehicles travel on highways through Show Low each month (based on traffic counts collected by photo enforcement cameras). 

Accreditation

 

The Show Low Police Department became internationally accredited by CALEA (Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies) at the conference in Scottsdale, Arizona in July 2012. 

CALEA’s accreditation program provides public safety agencies an opportunity to voluntarily demonstrate that they meet an established set of professional standards.

  • CALEA accreditation requires an agency to develop a comprehensive, well thought-out, uniform set of written directives.  This is one of the most successful methods for reaching administrative and operational goals, while also providing direction to personnel.
  • CALEA accreditation standards provide the necessary reports and analyses a CEO needs to make fact-based, informed management decisions.
  • CALEA accreditation requires a preparedness program be put in place—so an agency is ready to address natural or man-made unusual occurrences.
  • CALEA accreditation is a means for developing or improving upon an agency’s relationship with the community.
  • CALEA accreditation strengthens an agency’s accountability, both within the agency and the community, through a continuum of standards that clearly define authority, performance and responsibilities.
  • Being CALEA-accredited can limit an agency’s liability and risk exposure because it demonstrates that internationally recognized standards for law enforcement have been met, as verified by a team of independent outside CALEA-trained assessors.

·         CALEA accreditation facilitates an agency’s pursuit of professional excellence.
 

External Projects and Community Involvement for 2012

 

The following are examples of some of the many community activities/projects in which the Show Low Police Department was involved in 2012. 

  • Two 10-week Citizens’ Academies were completed.
  • Assisted with annual Memorial Day and Show Low Days events.
  • Participated in the Kids ROCK program for all Show Low 3rd graders.
  • Participated in the annual July 4th parade and fireworks.
  • Hosted several National Night Out block parties.
  • Partnered with Pet Allies to manage the Police Department’s animal shelter, saving over 500 animals in 2012 from euthanasia.
  • The Police Department hosted the annual Public Safety Open House.
  • Staffed the annual Spooktacular event.
  • Participated in the annual Electric Light Parade.
  • Co-sponsored the Annual Shop-with-a-Cop program, helping over 200 children.
  • The Police Department interfaced its Records Management System with Summit Health EMS in order to share call data with fire and EMS providers.
  • Updated the 911 phone system.
  • Connected Arrowhead EMS ambulances to the department’s Mobile Data Computer system.
  • Completed a $121,000 grant-funded microwave project involving Show Low Police Department, Navajo County, Snowflake-Taylor Police Department and Northland Pioneer College.
  • Facilitated the Children are Priceless Passengers education program, putting almost 200 free child seats into the community.
  • Hosted a low-cost rabies clinic, vaccinating approximately 114 dogs.
  • Raised $5,000 for Special Olympics.
  • Participated in county-wide, emergency management tabletop exercises.

Specific Police Activity and/or Important Cases

 

The following are examples of the types of calls and cases handled by the Show Low Police Department in 2012. 

·         There was a large fire at the pellet plant, lasting approximately 24 hours and resulting in highway and airport closures.

·         Responded to a plane crash that resulted in two fatalities.

·         There were 209 investigations involving drugs, which included seizures of paraphernalia, marijuana, narcotics, prescription drugs and cash.

·         Homicide Task Force officers investigated several cases in Navajo and Apache counties, including an officer-involved shooting in Show Low.

·         Filmed a segment on America’s Most Wanted in an effort to locate a suspect wanted for a double homicide in 2011.

·         Conducted a multi-agency investigation related to numerous daytime burglaries in several jurisdictions. After a lengthy foot chase, the suspect was caught in Show Low.

·         The multi-agency Special Response Team (SRT) handled six callouts.

·         There were 29 WeTip referrals made to the Police Department in 2012.  One of these tips led to the arrest and clearance of approximately 15 major criminal damage cases.

 

Additional Information

 

  • Senior Patrol has 26 active members who provided 8,633 hours of volunteer service in 2012.
  • All officers attended training provided by the FBI on responding to child abductions.
  • All officers received three days of training on constitutional law and updates to changes in Arizona law.
  • Training was provided to all officers on immigration enforcement (SB1070), HazMat, Incident Command Systems, defensive tactics, ethics and other continuing education topics.
  • A member of command staff completed the FBI National Academy, bringing the number of department graduates to four.